SLIDER

Hello!

My name is Erika. I'm in love with making art, collecting old things & chasing after my two kiddos. This blog is a peek into my happy accidents & plots of total world domination.

NEWSLETTER

Jean Michal Basquiat

 Jean Michael Basquet was a New York street artist whom went by the name SAMO (like same ol' sh**) and he was an artist that painted with his inner child while creating neo-expressionist paintings.  He dropped out of highschool in the 10th grade and by the time he was in his 20's he was good friends with Andy Warhol and even briefly dated Madonna.  He was famous for wearing a $1000 Armani suit while painting and then wearing the suit around town.  He didn't have a bank account and would leave piles of cash around his apartment and under seat cushions.  Jean died at 27 from a heroin overdose in 1988 and in 2007 one of his paintings was sold for 14.8 million.  He left behind 1000 paintings and 1000 drawings.
I watched the documentary Jean Michal Basquiat a Radiant Child about his life as an artist with his rise and fall of his life mixed up with his career.  This documentary had me thinking about what is success? Most showing artists would  love a fraction of the success that he received at such an early age.  How much success does one have to receive in order to be successful?  
PS Its on Instant Watch if you have Netflix :)

3 comments

Felicity said...

I love Basquiat, he's one of my favorites!

bobbi said...

Those times must have been really crazy. Keith Haring, Basquiat, Wharol...
Madonna knew all three of them and they all died. If you want to be a painter, remember never to meet her.

Dave said...

Interesting question...what is success? Is it selling lots and lots of your art...or just being happy with what you are doing? I've done a lot of different things in my life...for me selling my pieces is away of feeling "accepted as an artist"...but when I complete a piece that I'm happy with...then I feel I've been successful. Thanks for the question...need to think about this more!!

© Erika Lee Sears